How to make a smoothie

Earlier this week I did a photo shoot for my new website, and this is the kitchen display we used at Lori Lesh Photography.  Lori also helped me shoot a video on how to make a breakfast smoothie.  There are quite a few smoothie recipes in the Clean Diet Challenge, a great way to start your day, or a wonderful snack that even the kids will love!  Lori asked to taste it when we were finished making the video, and said she would have never thought of putting lettuce or spinach in a smoothie, but she loved it!The other ingredients mask the flavor of the greens, but the greens are what give a smoothie the power punch of vital nutrients, often lacking in our cooked and overly processed foods.  You can leave out the coconut milk and opt for just filtered water. One rule of thumb, never add more than one ‘thickening’ item to a smoothie, or it will become too thick.  Thickening foods might include blueberries, bananas, or avocados.  Flax seed oil provides a ‘good’ fat, necessary for vitality.  Quick and simple recipe below: Smoothie recipe 1 stalk of kale (stem removed) or 3 romaine lettuce leaves 1 T. flax seed oil 1 small handful of baby spinach 1/2 banana 1 scoop of coconut yogurt 5 fresh strawberries Several small pieces of frozen mango 1/2 to 1 Cup coconut milk (unsweetened) ♥ Blend all ingredients in your favorite kitchen tool (I use a Vita-mix or Nutri-Bullet), then add filtered water to reach your desired consistency.  You can also add one scoop of a good quality protein powder.  The possibilities are...

Do I have a food intolerance?

Close to my heart and what I am most passionate about, is encouraging my clients to eat a clean diet, free of allergen-laden foods. Wheat (gluten), sugar, and dairy are the top offenders in our typical diet, with 6 other big ones in the chart below.  I work with my clients to get to the bottom of whether or not they have food sensitivities! An allergic response to an item might include hives, swelling, a rash or difficulty breathing from an immune response – common triggers are from peanuts or bee stings.  Allergies are most active in the area’s of the body that come into contact with the outside world – like your skin, lungs, nose, or GI tract. An intolerance on the other hand, does not involve the immune system.  The majority of toxic responses to food are the result of food intolerance’s, rather than an allergy. The most common food intolerance’s are lactose, sugar, gluten, preservatives and additives.  A food or food additive may contain a molecule that the body has difficulty breaking down or digesting, causing an intolerance response as that molecule is allowed to continue down into the GI tract. When the gut wall is compromised, food molecules that are not properly digested pass through, into the blood stream.  This can account for a rash on your arms, 2 days after ingesting an offensive food or additive. Intolerance responses are not immediate, but build up in your system over time. There are 3 ways to determine if you have a food sensitivity. You can get tested with an IgG blood test, you can go on an Elimination Diet, or...